BYOT and the jobs revolution

Do you know the latest trend in the office IT world? It’s called BYOT, short for Bring Your Own Technology. New young recruits into large multinationals are shocked by how awful the corporate IT systems are. This is a generation brought up on facebook, twitter, tablets  and smart phones; personal devices on which you can do a lot of cool stuff. Their first encounter with a corporate IT system makes them recoil in horror. It’s so slow, so clunky and so user unfriendly.

In most other industries, there is professional grade equipment for serious business use and then a cut down, ‘less good’ version for the home hobbyist. But in the IT world this has been inverted. All the cool stuff is at the consumer end of the market. This is catataxis. The level 1 ‘home’ gear runs faster and is more powerful than the level 2 ‘corporate’ gear.  Hence BYOT. You bring in your own laptop or iPad to use at work. You are responsible for maintaining it. You are happy because you get to use the cool gadgets that you like. The company is happy because the cost of equipment and maintenance goes down. Productivity is up and costs are down (by 22% in some pilot schemes). Everybody wins.

Well, not quite everybody. No-one in the IT department likes this trend at all, because having so many different devices gives them a big headache. BYOT is cynically known by IT staff as “the CEO bought an iPad” syndrome. Nirvana for IT staff is an organisation that uses exactly the same equipment everywhere, all under the centralised control of the IT Dept. Under their watchful eye, individualism is stamped out “for security and efficiency purposes”.

This drama is not new. Take a look at the Apple Mac advert from the dawn of the PC era. A female athlete runs through the hall of a political rally and hurls a hammer at a huge screen with the face of Big Brother on it. The final tagline says:

On January 24th, Apple Computer will introduce the Macintosh. And you’ll see why 1984 will not be like “1984”. 

Shot by Ridley Scott, this advert is almost 30 years old but it is still as powerful as ever and encapsulates the whole spirit of BYOT: the catataxic challenge of the individual against the corporate system one level higher. Steve Jobs’ revolution really is a revolution in jobs. And how satisfying that he finally got to see it happen before he died.

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